Welcome to my blog, a virtual scrapbook and road map for crafting a well-curated life. 

My husband and I are 30-something Bostonians with a passion for good food, fine company and exploring new places both near and far.  Follow along as I document our adventures and share my tips for traveling, dining and entertaining in style.

Sailing on the Adirondack III

Sailing on the Adirondack III

There is no better way to while away a gorgeous summer evening than setting off to sea at sunset aboard a classic wooden schooner.  As the sun dips below the horizon and her wind-filled sails carry you forward, you'll be transported back in time to a long-ago era when hundreds of tall ships, brigantines and sloops dotted the Massachusetts coastline.


During the years before the American Revolution, Boston was the premier shipping and trading port in North America, and hundreds of tall ships brought supplies in and out of her harbor on a continual basis.  Today, historic schooners such as the Adirondack III still cruise the harbor, offering locals and visitors alike the chance to experience turn of the century yachting while taking in the spectacular views of the city's modern skyline. 

Although we have lived here for fifteen years, we never tire of the opportunity to leave everyday life behind for a few hours and enjoy the simple pleasure of sailing on the open sea.  Day, sunset and evening sails are offered daily from May through October 16th.

 
Measuring 80 feet in length, the Adridontack III is modeled after 1890s style pilot schooners.  An all-wooden vessel with a white glass overlay hull, she boasts mahogany rails, two towering Douglas Fir masts and nearly 2,000 square feet of sail. 

Measuring 80 feet in length, the Adridontack III is modeled after 1890s style pilot schooners.  An all-wooden vessel with a white glass overlay hull, she boasts mahogany rails, two towering Douglas Fir masts and nearly 2,000 square feet of sail. 

 
“ALONG THE COAST of Massachusetts the maritime tradition is more than a phrase or a romantic legend. A regional habit of looking to the sea, born in the necessities of past generations, persists despite urban influences, the encroachment of the machine, the trend of the nineteenth century to the West, and all the various factors that have helped to lessen the relative importance of the merchant fleet in our national economy.”
— BOSTON LOOKS SEAWARD The Story of the Port: 1630-1940 Compiled by Workers of the Writers' Program of the Work Projects Administration in the State of Massachusetts
 

When traveling by air, land or sea, this Saint James dress is my absolute go-to; it dries quickly, is UV-resistant and unfailingly refuses to stain, shrink or wrinkle.  Pairing it with a navy skirt and grey blazer makes it office appropriate by day, and I can go from the boardroom to the boathouse without skipping a beat!


She starts, she moves, she seems to feel
The thrill of life along her keel,
And, spurning with her foot the ground,
With one exulting, joyous bound,
She leaps into the ocean’s arms!

— Longfellow, "The Building of the Ship"
We've gotten to know the crew over the years, and First Mate Brennon is always kind enough to let me sneak on to the bow and help set the sails!

We've gotten to know the crew over the years, and First Mate Brennon is always kind enough to let me sneak on to the bow and help set the sails!

Built as a working replica of an 1890s coastal schooner, the 67 foot Liberty Star also offers a variety of sailing cruises on the Boston Harbor.

But First, We Brunch: Dining at Bistro Du Midi

But First, We Brunch: Dining at Bistro Du Midi

'Cream of Spring' Soup

'Cream of Spring' Soup