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My husband and I are 30-something Bostonians with a passion for good food, fine company and exploring new places both near and far.  Follow along as I document our adventures and share my tips for traveling, dining and entertaining in style.

Pan Seared Pork Chops with Cranberry-Apple Chutney

Pan Seared Pork Chops with Cranberry-Apple Chutney

Sweet, tangy and bursting with the flavors of the season, this cranberry-apple chutney is the perfect fall accompaniment to juicy pan seared pork chops.


It's autumn in New England, and apples, pumpkins and squash are ubiquitous this time of year.  The arrival of fall in Massachusetts also marks the commencement of our celebrated cranberry harvest season.  First commercially cultivated over two centuries ago, today more than 14,000 acres of cranberry bogs can be found nestled amongst the small towns and villages that dot our southern shores, Cape and Islands. 

In this bright and tangy chutney, the tartness of the rubied fruit is mellowed by the addition of sweet orchard apples.  Caramelized shallots and a red-wine reduction lend a depth of flavor which renders it an ideal complement to juicy pan seared pork chops. 


Ingredients

Cranberry-Apple Chutney

My cranberry-apple chutney recipe was inspired by our apple picking adventure at Nashoba Valley Winery as well as a recent fall weekend on Cape Cod.  Paired with seared pork chops, it makes for a comforting, but not-too-heavy dinner that's just right for cooler autumn evenings. 

My cranberry-apple chutney recipe was inspired by our apple picking adventure at Nashoba Valley Winery as well as a recent fall weekend on Cape Cod.  Paired with seared pork chops, it makes for a comforting, but not-too-heavy dinner that's just right for cooler autumn evenings. 

  • One tablespoon of extra-virgin olive oil
  • One tablespoon of butter
  • One cup of shallots, diced
  • One cup of fresh cranberries (frozen, thawed berries may be used in a pinch)
  • Two medium apples, peeled and diced
  • One cup of dry red wine (I used Nashoba Valley Winery's St. Croix Dry Estate Wine)
  • 1/2 cup of apple cider
  • Two tablespoons of honey
  • 1/4 teaspoon of allspice
  • One teaspoon of chopped fresh thyme
  • Freshly ground black pepper and sea salt, to taste

Pan Seared Pork Chops

  • Four, six-ounce pork chops
  • Two tablespoons of extra-virgin olive oil
  • SalFreshly ground black pepper and sea salt, to taste

 


Instructions

Cranberry-Apple Chutney

In a medium skillet, heat butter and olive oil until melted.  Add the shallots and reduce heat. Cook over very low heat for thirty to forty-five minutes, stirring occasionally to avoid burning.  When the shallots have turned a rich golden brown, add the wine and bring just to a boil, using a spoon or spatula to scrape the browned bits from the bottom of the pan.  Reduce heat and simmer until the liquid has nearly evaporated and become quite syrupy.  Add the apple cider, cranberries and apples and simmer until the berries begin to burst, approximately two minutes.  Add the honey, allspice and thyme and cook for two to three minutes more, until the fruit is soft but not mushy.  Season with salt and pepper to taste.  Serve warm or at room temperature.

Pan Seared Pork Chops

The secret to perfectly seared chops is a hot pan and hands off; try to avoid moving the meat in order to allow a crispy crust to develop.

The secret to perfectly seared chops is a hot pan and hands off; try to avoid moving the meat in order to allow a crispy crust to develop.

Pat pork chops dry and sprinkle generously with salt and pepper.  Wrap tightly and refrigerate for at least two hours and up to six. 

Allow the chops to come to room temperature before cooking. 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Heat the olive oil in an oven proof skillet until very hot, but not smoking.  Add the pork chops and sear for three minutes on each side, avoiding moving the chops to the extent possible.  Transfer the skillet to the oven and roast until the desired internal temperature is reached (I prefer mine just shy of pink, or around 140 degrees; however I acknowledge that this is inconsistent with U.S.D.A. food safety guidelines).  Serve immediately.

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Orchards and Vineyards

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